Facts About The Parabolic Coin

The Crypto-Bubble – A Speculator’s Dream in Cyberspace

When writing an article about the recent move in bitcoin, one should probably not begin by preparing the chart images. Chances are one will have to do it all over again. It is a bit like ordering a cup of coffee in Weimar Germany in early November 1923. One had to pay for it right away, as a cup costing one wheelbarrow of Reichsmark may well end up costing two wheelbarrows of Reichsmark half an hour later. These days the question is how many wheelbarrows of US dollars one may need to pay for a bitcoin.

<img data-attachment-id="49567" data-permalink="http://sentinelblog.com/?p=49567&quot; data-orig-file="" data-orig-size="" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="[]" data-image-title=" FDA, mainstream media denounce nano silver as ‘bogus cure’ for Ebola virus" data-image-description="

Editor’s Note:  I believe he is refering to “Colloidal Silver”: which I FULLY endorse, and personally use, as needed for all types of Viruses, Bacteria, and Fungus – I have multiple personal experiences with friends and family, and 100% success when properly used…  Email me if you would like to know where to buy.

Full disclosure: I have no vested interest in the source what so ever, I make n0 commission, nor referral fee at all – I have simply found a source for the most concentrated material I am aware of…

by Mike Adams, Natural News:

There’s a very interesting showdown taking place right now in the realm of Ebola treatments and cures. At stake is billions of dollars in potential vaccine profits as well as potentially tens of millions of lives of an Ebola pandemic outbreak takes place.

Here’s a summary of what’s happening so far, as best I can tell:

• The world of conventional medicine currently has ZERO proven treatments, vaccines or cures for treating Ebola.

The recent Ebola media panic resulted in tremendous FDA pressure to authorize Ebola vaccine trials run by a company called Tekmira, whose stock price skyrocketed nearly 100% after the announcement.

• As Ebola news continued to spread, some websites began to claim they had various cures or treatments that could treat or prevent Ebola. For example, this web page claims something called “Monolaurin” is the answer to Ebola.

• The New York Times published an article explaining that the FDA had “issued warnings over Ebola cures.” This article specifically named Dr. Rima Laibow for asserting that nano silver can kill Ebola.

• At the same time, however, the New York Times also published this highly speculative article which ridiculously asserts that statin drugs might treat Ebola, even though there is no evidence of such a claim.

• Interestingly, the New York Times did not warn its readers about the New York Times promoting bogus ebola cures in the form of statin drugs. The pattern that’s emerging from the NYT is quite predictable: All experimental pharmaceuticals from the world of western medicine are assumed to be of value, while all experimental treatments from the world of holistic medicine are assumed to be fraud. This stance is, of course, wholly unscientific from the outset.

It also brings up the question: “What’s the difference between an unproven drug treatment and an unproven holistic treatment?” The answer is “faith.” Western culture has faith in western medicine, so drug treatments and vaccines are assumed to always work. Who needs proof when irrational faith in western drugs is sufficient?

As all this was happening, Dr. Rima Laibow of the Natural Solutions Foundation published this page which asserts that a 2009 Dept. of Defense study “finds nano silver inhibits ebola virus.” Since this page was published, Dr. Laibow has apparently sought to alert scientists and political leaders of many different countries about this treatment, explaining that an Ebola outbreak may be part of a population reduction plan.

Dr. Laibow’s actions really set off alarm bells across the FDA and the mainstream media, both of which seem to be spinning up their torpedoes to fire away at anyone who claims anything other than a drug or a vaccine might treat Ebola.

Read More @ NaturalNews.com

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” class=”aligncenter wp-image-49567″ src=”https://wchildblog.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/das-coin-1024×678.jpg&#8221; alt=”” width=”640″ height=”423″>Is it real? (As our readers know, the nature of reality poses certain problems).  When we started writing this, bitcoin had just moved up by more than $600 in one week to its then level of $2,400 –  within a little more than a day it reached an interim peak of $2,760, then plunged to an interim low of around $1850 in just two trading days, only to rally to a new high of $2,930 over the next two weeks. Currently it trades at $2,750 (don’t hold it against us if these figures are no longer true by the time this post is published).

Naturally, the increasingly parabolic look of the bitcoin chart raises the question  whether it represents a bubble, and if so, how large it will become. A good answer to the second part of the question is usually “larger than anyone thinks possible”. As to the first part, it may be fair to say that it has been in a bubble since shortly after its birth. At one point in 2009 the currency could be bought for 1/100 of 1 US cent (USD 0,0001). It rallied to 5 cents by 2010, which is quite a big move. We dimly remember a story about a pizza restaurant selling Margheritas for BTC 20,000 apiece at the time. In 2011 it reached a peak of $18.50 – and so on, and so forth.

In recent weeks we occasionally watched in mute fascination as bitcoin fluctuated in ranges of several hundred dollars in the space of a few hours. On May 22 it had a little dip just below the $2,000 mark to give everyone a good entry point. But would it really be worth it? What if the bubble was about to collapse? Three days later the courageous dip buyers were up by almost 40%. Given how overbought bitcoin looks, one would have thought it a good idea to take the money and run, but of course we have no idea how crazy things will still get before everybody really starts dialing 1-800-GETMEOUT.

<img data-attachment-id="49563" data-permalink="http://sentinelblog.com/2014/08/19/fake-tv-for-home-security/" data-orig-file="" data-orig-size="" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="[]" data-image-title=" Fake TV For Home Security" data-image-description="

Source: Modern Survival Blog, by Ken Jorgustin

During the night, a TV appears as a flickering shimmer of colors and hues against a window, shade, or curtain, as viewed from the outside. It sends a message (to the outside) that someone is home, watching TV. A home burglar looking for a vacant home to burglarize – will move on…

Home security and burglar deterrence should be thought of in ‘layers’. In addition to deterrents such as outdoor motion lights, security stickers & placards, deadbolts, bump-proof locks, long screws in your door strike-plate, an x-large dog bowl on the front porch, a real or fake security camera, etc., consider what the INSIDE of your home looks like as viewed from the OUTSIDE to a potential burglar.

I came across the following ‘Fake TV’, which I now use as part of my overall home security plan when I’m away from home. It is very effective…

If you are away from home for awhile on a trip or vacation, in addition to setting up a few lights on timers for the evening, the illusion of a TV turned on will add a very real appearance that someone is home – adding an additional layer of security.

This Fake TV is a device that simulates a TV by producing realistic random patterns of flickering light. It consumes a tiny fraction of the power of a real TV and can be simply plugged in to a wall outlet or connected to a 24-hour timer for the evening hours you wish it to be ON.

Read More Here: ModernSurvivalBlog.com

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” class=”aligncenter wp-image-49563″ src=”https://wchildblog.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/1-bitcoin-daily3-1024×425.png&#8221; alt=”” width=”640″ height=”266″>Bitcoin, daily – at the time we copy/pasted this chart, it traded at $2,750. By the time we finish writing this post, it may be quite a bit lower or higher – maybe we should flip a bitcoin to decide which way it will go next – click to enlarge.

A competing crypto-currency by the name of Ethereum (what a name!) has gained more than 2,400% this year, rising from $10 in January to $258 in early June. The move from $80 to $258 took just three weeks. So yes, it is a bubble of sorts, with an almost Tulipomania-like air about it. It is a speculator’s dream in many ways – BTC and ETH are undoubtedly great trading sardines. What interests us though is why this is happening. What is driving it?

Fractal Patterns

One interesting thing about the chart of bitcoin is that it has a text-book Elliott wave shape (we have not labeled the chart, but it seems obvious to us that it lends itself to such labeling). This applies to the weekly chart shown further below as well and also to other time frames. Regardless of what one thinks of Elliott wave theory, price trends in financial markets definitely have fractal characteristics.

Empirically they consist of sequences of patterns that are recurring over and over again in every conceivable time frame, i.e., the same patterns (or rather, very similar patterns, such as for instance triangles) that form on daily, weekly or monthly charts, also form on one minute, ten minute and hourly charts. These patterns appear to reflect various stages in the evolution of market psychology within the time frames captured by these charts.

R.N. Elliott cataloged such recurring patterns in the stock market and tried to find out if they followed rules that could be defined and used for forecasts. Obviously such an endeavor is fraught with many difficulties. Particularly the validity of the theoretical framework that was created after the empirical identification of said patterns and the promulgation of the technical rules governing the Elliott wave principle seems questionable.

But that is not really what we want to discuss here. One doesn’t necessarily have to believe that the Elliott wave principle is valid or useful for making accurate market forecasts in order to recognize that its leading practitioners have gathered a number of useful empirical insights.

In this particular case we mention it mainly because typically, “textbook” Elliott wave patterns only emerge in markets with broad participation. Since these patterns reflect the predominant mood of market participants, or if you will, the “market mind”, recognizable shapes only tend to form in liquid markets with a large number of participants. While we cannot say what precisely the threshold is, i.e., at what point pure randomness is replaced with something that resembles a more orderly arrangement, the price chart itself conveys the information that the threshold has been crossed.

The bid/ask spread of bitcoin is usually quite tight as well, although it has tended to widen amid the recent increase in volatility. We observed trading activity at one of the larger exchanges while it traded around $2,400 and a the time the bid/ask spread fluctuated from as little as 30 cents to short term wides of up to $7 when short term volatility spiked. Even at its widest the spread was therefore just ~0.2%, which also shows that this is market with broad participation. Keep in mind that we just observed the spread over a limited time window, it is therefore possible that it will occasionally be wider, but probably not by much.

<img data-attachment-id="49564" data-permalink="http://sentinelblog.com/?p=49564" data-orig-file="" data-orig-size="" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="[]" data-image-title=" Fake TV For Home Security" data-image-description="

Source: Modern Survival Blog, by Ken Jorgustin

During the night, a TV appears as a flickering shimmer of colors and hues against a window, shade, or curtain, as viewed from the outside. It sends a message (to the outside) that someone is home, watching TV. A home burglar looking for a vacant home to burglarize – will move on…

Home security and burglar deterrence should be thought of in ‘layers’. In addition to deterrents such as outdoor motion lights, security stickers & placards, deadbolts, bump-proof locks, long screws in your door strike-plate, an x-large dog bowl on the front porch, a real or fake security camera, etc., consider what the INSIDE of your home looks like as viewed from the OUTSIDE to a potential burglar.

I came across the following ‘Fake TV’, which I now use as part of my overall home security plan when I’m away from home. It is very effective…

If you are away from home for awhile on a trip or vacation, in addition to setting up a few lights on timers for the evening, the illusion of a TV turned on will add a very real appearance that someone is home – adding an additional layer of security.

This Fake TV is a device that simulates a TV by producing realistic random patterns of flickering light. It consumes a tiny fraction of the power of a real TV and can be simply plugged in to a wall outlet or connected to a 24-hour timer for the evening hours you wish it to be ON.

Read More Here: ModernSurvivalBlog.com

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” class=”aligncenter wp-image-49564″ src=”https://wchildblog.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/2-bitcoin-weekly3-1024×376.png&#8221; alt=”” width=”640″ height=”235″>Bitcoin, weekly. In this time frame one can also clearly discern the Elliott wave shape of the bitcoin chart, which is currently in its fifth major bubble–like move since 2009. The earliest bubble phases are not really discernible on this linear chart, but in percentage terms they were actually far larger than the two big moves that can be immediately recognized. In other words, the biggest profits were actually made  from 2009 to 2013 – click to enlarge.

In short, a large number of market participants evidently regards bitcoin at the very least as a legitimate investment asset. Everything we write here will ultimately lead to the one question we really want to discuss, namely bitcoin’s status as “money”. We will get to that in Part 2, but we can tell you already that we continue to regard it as a secondary medium of exchange.

Exchanges in Trouble with Correspondence Banks – Honni Soit Qui Mal Y Pense!

<img data-attachment-id="49568" data-permalink="http://sentinelblog.com/2014/08/21/using-sweat-to-charge-your-cell-phone/&quot; data-orig-file="" data-orig-size="" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="[]" data-image-title=" Using Sweat To Charge Your Cell Phone" data-image-description="

Source: Oil Price, by Andy Tully

Imagine using daily exercise not just to power your body, but also your cell phone.

That’s what a team of scientists at the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) are working on, with the aid of a temporary tattoo that monitors a person’s progress during exercise and generates power from their sweat.

The tattoo detects lactate, a substance in sweat and “a very important indicator of how you are doing during exercise,” says Wenzhao Jia, a postdoctoral researcher at UCSD involved in the study. A report of her team’s findings was prepared for presentation on Aug. 13 at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco.

Tiring exercise triggers a process called “glycolysis,” which produces energy to maintain the exercise, as well as lactate, which can be detected in your blood.

Professional athletes evaluate their fitness and the quality of their training programs by monitoring their lactate levels. Doctors do it for patients with heart or lung disease, both of which cause abnormally high levels of lactate.

Current monitoring for athletes is clumsy, though, because blood samples need to be collected and analyzed during exercise, not after.

The UCSD team came up with a faster, easier and less intrusive way to get this done. They printed a flexible lactate sensor onto paper used to transfer temporary tattoos to skin. The sensor includes an enzyme that removes electrons from lactate, which generates a weak electrical current.

The researchers then applied the tattoos to the upper arms of 10 healthy volunteers and measured the electrical current produced during increasingly strenuous exercise on a stationary bicycle over a half-hour. Grasping the significance of their discovery, they built a sweat-powered “biobattery.”

Read More Here: OilPrice.com

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” class=”aligncenter wp-image-49568″ src=”https://wchildblog.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/royal_coat_of_arms_of_the_united_kingdom-svg-1-1024×991.png&#8221; alt=”” width=”500″ height=”484″>Honni Soit Qui Mal Y Pense (shame on anyone who thinks ill of it). The motto appears on a representation of the garter surrounding the Shield of the Royal coat of arms of the United Kingdom. It already appeared in the 16thcentury on the coat of arms of John of Gaunt.

One of the things that make bitcoin so attractive is that it allows anonymous, untraceable payments to be made, without middlemen. We actually have to amend that a bit: there are middlemen, since transactions have to be processed, or rather “confirmed” by bitcoin miners, and they charge a fee for that. These fees have recently risen sharply as the number of transactions has spiked, while the technical capabilities of the blockchain to handle them in a timely manner remains limited (a.k.a. the scalability problem).

In fact, bitcoin first came to the broader public’s attention when it was revealed that the “Silk Road” market for illegal drugs and unregistered weapons on the darkweb used bitcoin as its medium of exchange. When news of this were reported in the press for the first time, the third bitcoin bubble got going.

We actually don’t believe such marketplaces should even be illegal, as we have grave reservations regarding the prohibitions that make them so, but obviously, the anonymity of bitcoin transactions is a helpful feature for shadow economy entrepreneurs. When people learned about this, their assessment of bitcoin’s potential to become a legitimate medium of exchange, i.e., money, changed drastically.

It is little surprise that bitcoin exchanges have often turned out to be somewhat opaque institutions as well. The formerly biggest one, Mt. Gox, found an ignominious end in 2013, with most of its customers bitcoins ending up stolen. Two of the largest (by volume) exchanges today are BTC-e and Bitfinex. No-one even knows where the servers of BTC-e are physically located, and only the first names of its owners are publicly known (they sound Russian). The exchange is as anonymous as a botcoin wallet, so to speak. And yet, it is the second-largest bitcoin exchange in the world.

Bitfinex is located in Taiwan and has been at great pains to project an image of legitimacy, but that hasn’t helped it from being hampered by one of the interfaces with the world outside of bitcoin it urgently needs to actually function in the long run. To be precise, what happened was that its US correspondence bank Wells Fargo stopped servicing Bitstamp and its customers.

At the same time Wells Fargo also withdrew from servicing Tether and its customers. Tether issues the “Tether Dollar” (USDT) – a crypto-currency that is backed 1:1 with US dollars, but can be used for transactions over blockchain type wallets and has become a popular replacement for USD on bitcoin exchanges. Although every USDT in issue seems indeed backed by one dollar, it has become impossible to exchange them unless one is a resident of Taiwan.

In the meantime these problems have spread to other bitcoin exchanges and several of them now find themselves unable to transfer or receive US dollars. This has created a very interesting situation. In a way, Bitfinex has become a closed system, as most of the dollars that are already deposited there will have to remain there for the time being.

In response to this development, many traders exchanged their dollars at Bitfinex for bitcoin, as bitcoin balances can of course still be transferred to bitcoin wallets without a hitch. Banking cartel members cannot get in the way, nor can anyone else. This has caused bitcoin to temporarily trade at premiums of more than $100 at Bitfinex and was no doubt a major factor in fueling the recent rally.

<img data-attachment-id="49565" data-permalink="http://sentinelblog.com/2014/08/19/fda-mainstream-media-denounce-nano-silver-as-bogus-cure-for-ebola-virus/" data-orig-file="" data-orig-size="" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="[]" data-image-title="FDA, mainstream media denounce nano silver as ‘bogus cure’ for Ebola virus" data-image-description="

Editor’s Note:  I believe he is refering to “Colloidal Silver”: which I FULLY endorse, and personally use, as needed for all types of Viruses, Bacteria, and Fungus – I have multiple personal experiences with friends and family, and 100% success when properly used…  Email me if you would like to know where to buy.

Full disclosure: I have no vested interest in the source what so ever, I make n0 commission, nor referral fee at all – I have simply found a source for the most concentrated material I am aware of…

by Mike Adams, Natural News:

There’s a very interesting showdown taking place right now in the realm of Ebola treatments and cures. At stake is billions of dollars in potential vaccine profits as well as potentially tens of millions of lives of an Ebola pandemic outbreak takes place.

Here’s a summary of what’s happening so far, as best I can tell:

• The world of conventional medicine currently has ZERO proven treatments, vaccines or cures for treating Ebola.

The recent Ebola media panic resulted in tremendous FDA pressure to authorize Ebola vaccine trials run by a company called Tekmira, whose stock price skyrocketed nearly 100% after the announcement.

• As Ebola news continued to spread, some websites began to claim they had various cures or treatments that could treat or prevent Ebola. For example, this web page claims something called “Monolaurin” is the answer to Ebola.

• The New York Times published an article explaining that the FDA had “issued warnings over Ebola cures.” This article specifically named Dr. Rima Laibow for asserting that nano silver can kill Ebola.

• At the same time, however, the New York Times also published this highly speculative article which ridiculously asserts that statin drugs might treat Ebola, even though there is no evidence of such a claim.

• Interestingly, the New York Times did not warn its readers about the New York Times promoting bogus ebola cures in the form of statin drugs. The pattern that’s emerging from the NYT is quite predictable: All experimental pharmaceuticals from the world of western medicine are assumed to be of value, while all experimental treatments from the world of holistic medicine are assumed to be fraud. This stance is, of course, wholly unscientific from the outset.

It also brings up the question: “What’s the difference between an unproven drug treatment and an unproven holistic treatment?” The answer is “faith.” Western culture has faith in western medicine, so drug treatments and vaccines are assumed to always work. Who needs proof when irrational faith in western drugs is sufficient?

As all this was happening, Dr. Rima Laibow of the Natural Solutions Foundation published this page which asserts that a 2009 Dept. of Defense study “finds nano silver inhibits ebola virus.” Since this page was published, Dr. Laibow has apparently sought to alert scientists and political leaders of many different countries about this treatment, explaining that an Ebola outbreak may be part of a population reduction plan.

Dr. Laibow’s actions really set off alarm bells across the FDA and the mainstream media, both of which seem to be spinning up their torpedoes to fire away at anyone who claims anything other than a drug or a vaccine might treat Ebola.

Read More @ NaturalNews.com

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” class=”aligncenter wp-image-49565″ src=”https://wchildblog.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/3-bitfinex-cold-wallet-2-1024×555.png&#8221; alt=”” width=”640″ height=”347″>The contents of the Bitfinex “cold wallet” – the third richest bitcoin address in the world, which holds the bitcoin of Bitfinex customers. The plunge in the wallet’s balance in April was triggered by the exchange’s banking problems. There seems to be hope that the problem will be resolved eventually, so balances have slightly increased again from their previous low point. Moreover, clients based in Taiwan are not affected by the correspondence bank issue and can still withdraw or deposit any currency they like.

In the meantime many speculators in Asian countries, from Korea to Japan to China seem to have become active in the bitcoin market and are adding more fuel to the fire, but we suspect that the increasing problems with getting US dollars or other fiat currencies in and out of numerous bitcoin exchanges is actually the major factor driving the rally.

At the same time it has become known that Fidelity is now a bitcoin miner, accepts bitcoin as payment in its cafeteria and has hooked up with Coinbase, another bitcoin exchange. We have not yet heard about Coinbase experiencing correspondence bank problems, so it looks almost as if traders are herded into specific exchanges. As we said above: Honi soit qui mal y pense!

What makes this interesting to us is the fact that one of the reasons why bitcoin functions as a secondary medium of exchange is precisely the fact that it is considered “liquid”, i.e., that it can be exchanged for fiat currencies at any time at a reasonably small bid/ask spread. We currently don’t believe that all bitcoin exchanges will be cut off from the fiat money system, but some sort of concerted attempt at suppression of these exchanges is clearly underway.

“Moneyness”

It may well be that Wells Fargo and other banks are merely concerned about potential regulatory issues if they continue to work with bitcoin exchanges – but why now all of a sudden and not before? In any case, the issue is important in connection with the potential for bitcoin and other crypto currencies to become genuine media of exchange, i.e., money that is accepted widely for the final payment for other goods and services in the economy without reservations.

In Part 2 we will return to discussing bitcoin in the context of monetary theory. We already pointed out in past articles that a good case can be made that bitcoin does not conflict with Menger’s theory on the origin of money or the related regression theorem of Ludwig von Mises. We have given the issue some more thought in the meantime and have come up with a few new ideas in this context which we think support this argument.

We still prefer gold as the premier “stateless” money – or let us rather say, monetary asset, since gold is nowadays not really money in the strictest definition of the term, even though the markets of course treat it as they would any other currency. But that doesn’t mean that bitcoin is not a viable contender for “moneyness” as well – particularly as it is a creature of the free market, just as gold money is.

The fact that assorted fiat monies have recently declined faster against bitcoin than against gold is irrelevant in this context. In our opinion gold still enjoys advantages bitcoin cannot hope to match. More on this in part 2.

Addendum and Bonus Chart

As we finish writing this article, bitcoin trades at $2855 – it hasn’t taken very long for it to gain another $100. And here is a daily chart of the closest bitcoin competitor ethereum (ETH-USD) – which as you might guess, has risen a bit further as well:

<img data-attachment-id="49566" data-permalink="http://sentinelblog.com/2014/08/22/nigerian-doctor-claims-ebola-virus-is-germ-warfare/" data-orig-file="" data-orig-size="" data-comments-opened="0" data-image-meta="[]" data-image-title="Nigerian doctor claims Ebola virus is ‘germ warfare’" data-image-description="

Source: Digital Journal, by Karen Graham, August 2014

Calling the Ebola virus a threat to national security, Dr. Ona Ekhomu, President of the Association of Industrial Security and Safety Operators of Nigeria (AIS­SON), called on the government to appoint a military head to take over Nigeria’s response.

According to the Premium Times, the doctor who treated Patrick Sawyer, the Liberian-American who brought Ebola into the country, at First Consultant Hospital, and subsequently came down with the Ebola virus, has recovered and been discharged from the isolation center in Lagos.

Adebayo Onajole, Director of Communication and Community Mobilization for the Nigerian Emergency Operation Center on Ebola Virus Disease, confirmed the doctor had been treated and now was discharged, without giving further details. He did say the Minister of Health, Onyebuchi Chukwu, would give further details at a press conference to be held later.

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan has angrily asserted that until Patrick Sawyer brought Ebola into Nigeria, the country was free of the disease, calling Sawyer’s action “madness.” Jonathan has since declared a state of national emergency in the country

Dr. Ona Ekhomu, taking the outbreak of Ebola to the next level, wants a military commander appointed to take charge of the crisis in order to avoid a national disaster in the making. He said, “The Ebola pandemic is a germ warfare against Nigeria and Nigerians and it must be defined as the national security threat that it is, and combated vigorously in order to save Nigerians’ lives.”

Ekhomu went on to say the Nigerian government should have closed the borders as far back as in June of this year as it became apparent that the virus was spreading. Calling the outbreak of Ebola virus a “pandemic,” he even asserted that air-borders should have been closed to countries like Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Ekhomu said the government’s response on all levels to the biological weapon of mass destruction (WMD) was too little too late.

Referring to the nurse who left quarantine conditions to travel out of Lagos and infect others before dying herself, Ekhomu said that military personnel should be deployed to not only protect patients in quarantine, but they should all be in one central location. Ekhomu claims that “it is irresponsible to expect persons said to be under quarantine to police themselves. They must be guarded by the military in the public’s interest.”

Continue reading…

” data-medium-file=”” data-large-file=”” class=”aligncenter wp-image-49566″ src=”https://wchildblog.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/4-ethereum-daily-1024×451.png&#8221; alt=”” width=”640″ height=”282″>Ethereum, daily – from $10 earlier this year to $264 today – click to enlarge.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s